Victor Lesisz, Marissa Rose
The Waiting Heart...Essay and Graph, Don't Wait — Gematria, Title Cipher

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SchoolTrinity High School


TeacherNancy Barile


Selected Research



"Reducing Troponin Turnaround Time Through the Application of Lean/Six Sigma Processes and Evaluating Public Response Time to Heart Attack Symptoms," Karen Kruzer


Selected ArtThe Waiting Heart, Cody Reshonsky


Selected Language"Don't Wait," Chelsea Hart

The Waiting Heart...Essay

The Waiting Heart, by Cody Reshonsky, is a hauntingly beautiful expression of the need for immediate action when tragedy strikes the very force behind human life: the heart. In this illustration, Cody utilized an hourglass to represent the evanescent slip of time. The image was obviously drawn very carefully to demonstrate symmetric geometrical properties. When incorporated into a Cartesian coordinate system, this hourglass shape exhibits a prime example of origin symmetry. Each quadrant of such a graph contains identical pieces, though these fragments are reversed vertically and horizontally about the x and y-axes

The goal of this analysis is to approximately replicate this image onto a graph system using paper-pencil methods and a graphing calculator. To begin, the image was first traced onto a piece of graph paper while coinciding the center of the image with the origin of the graph; the result of this was striking, as the image coincidentally conformed to the graph to produce numbers that were easy to work with, such as a range of [-10,10]. Once this was completed, a few points were approximated to produce a stat plot on the graphing calculator; these points mimicked the large upper bowl-shape of the hourglass. Using these coordinates, the QuadReg command was performed on the calculator to estimate the name of the best fitting function for these points. This function was then reversed to produce the bottom half of the hourglass. The remaining pieces of this graph were determined using the original drawn graph to estimate the horizontal lines and via paper-pencil methods to assess diagonal lines and best-fitting square root functions.


Although a completely accurate representation of the image could not be obtained, this analysis gives an example of how math and geometry are applied and are essential to a multitude of art forms. The equations shown on the diagram are approximations that demonstrate our approach and our technique.

"Don't Wait" — Gematria

Working with writer Chelsea Hart's "Don't Wait" was indeed a challenge. It was fairly difficult to conceive a creative way of applying mathematical principles to the piece, due to the brief nature of haiku poems. After hours of meditative brainstorming, an idea was finally adopted from a source as ancient as math itself. The procedure we chose to implement is known as "Gematria," which is a system of assigning numerical value to a word or phrase. This system was developed and heavily utilized by past cultures, most notably in Greek and Hebrew societies. In early and even modern uses of Gematria, it is believed that words or phrases with identical numerical values bear some relation to each other or with the number value itself. Gematria and similar systems, such as numerology, have been repeatedly used to determine things such as the dates of the world's beginning and end. Although these are unreliable calculations, the results tend to bear some curious connections.

In our trial of Gematria, we decided to apply numerical values to Chelsea Hart's haiku according to the numerical place of the letters in the English alphabet. As the piece was written in two languages, a trial was performed for both the Spanish and English translations. Here is what each interpretation looks like before and after substituting the numerical values in:

This analysis of Gematria in Chelsea Hart's "Don't Wait" does not appear to convey significant correlations between words within the system that was proposed. Yet, could these values hold meaning in the world beyond the scope of our investigation? Only time and further experimentation can tell.

Title Cipher

"Reducing Troponin Turnaround Time Through the Application of Lean/Six Sigma Processes and Evaluating Public Response Time to Heart Attack Symptoms."

We first started out with the title of Karen's project. We wanted to put this title into to our own cipher-code. We arranged each letter in a grid-type arrangement, placing the letters vertically in 8 rows with 16 columns. For example, we started with 'Reducing Troponin Turnaround'; therefore, those three words were placed in the grid as follows.

RTTN

ERUD

DOR

UPN

COA

INR

NIO

GNU

We then continued on with this pattern using the rest of the words in the title. We also chose to include the slash in 'Lean/Six' and the period at the end of the title so that we had an even number of letter/characters in each row. (16 letters/characters per row)

R T T N R A I N M S A P S M T Y

E R U D O P O / A E L U P E A M

D O R T U P N S P S U B O T T P

U P N I G L O I R A A L N O T T

C O A M H I F X O N T I S H A O

I N R E T C L S C D I C E E C M

N I O T H A E I E E N R T A K S

G N U H E T A G S V G E I R S .

We then divided the rows into groups of four letters as follows…

RTTN RAIN MSAP SMTY

ERUD OPO/ AELU PEAM

DORT UPNS PSUB OTTP

UPNI GLOI RAAL NOTT

COAM HIFX ONTI SHAO

INRE TCLS CDIC EECM

NIOT HAEI EENR TAKS

GNUH ETAG SVGE IRS.

We then re-arranged the four letters in the sequence 4132 as follows…

NRTT NRIA PMAS YSTM

DEUR /OOP UALE MPAE

TDRO SUNP BPUS POTT

IUNP IGOL LRAA TNTO

MCAO XHFI IOTN OSAH

EIRN STLC CCID MECE

TNOI IHEA RENE STKA

HGUN GEAT ESGV .ISR

We ended up with a 'secret code' for the title of Karen's project. See if you can guess how the code might be solved...

Selected Research

Selected Art

Selected Language



Karen Kruzer

Reducing Troponin Turnaround Time Through the Application of Lean/Six Sigma Processes and Evaluating Public Response Time to Heart Attack Symptoms