Sonja Reeder
The Role of Diabetic Control in Decreasing Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

SchoolCleveland School of Science and Medicine at John Hay


ProgramNursing


MentorTerri Pierson, MSN, RN


DepartmentChronic Care Services at Huron Hospital


Research
The Role of Diabetic Control in Decreasing Chronic Kidney Disease Progression
Hypothesis
Comprehensive care and control of diabetes will slow the progression of renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Methodology
This retrospective chart review involved 25 patients (17 male and 9 female) at Huron and Euclid hospitals who have a dual diagnosis of CKD and diabetes, and who have received comprehensive care for at least seven months. The measuring tool for determining CKD stabilization was gathered through the review of hypertension status, using the benchmark of systolic < 130 and diastolic < 80, diabetic control benchmarking Hemoglobin (HGB) A1C < 7 and CKD progression benchmarking glomerular filtration rate (GFR) > 60.
Outcomes
We found an 18-point drop in systolic blood pressure with stabilization of diastolic blood pressure and a decrease in HGB A1C by 0.986%. Surprisingly, there was a decline in GFR by 8.9%. The average CKD staging at the start of the program was 3.48. Though the results did not meet benchmark, patients who received the comprehensive care initiated in the later stages of their renal disease remained off dialysis for an average of 26.52 months.

Interpretations

I Watched You Die by Tiearra Morris