Peter DiFilippo
The Impact of Physical Therapy on Frailty, Fall Prevention and Activities of Daily Living

SchoolWooster High School


ProgramScience


MentorT. David Cannon, MA, and Kate Bandstra, DPT


DepartmentRehabilitation Services at Cleveland Clinic Wooster


Research
The Impact of Physical Therapy on Frailty, Fall Prevention and Activities of Daily Living
Hypothesis
Patients with gait abnormality, balance insufficiency, frailty/weakness or history of falling who partake in physical therapy will experience more improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) than those with similar diagnoses who do not undergo physical therapy.
Methodology
Surveys were given via telephone to 25 patients who had undergone physical therapy. A similar survey was given to 10 patients who had the same set of diagnoses but did not undergo physical therapy. The surveys looked at performance of ADL before and after physical therapy, and before and after a doctor visit.
Outcomes
Patients who participated in physical therapy saw more improvements in their ability to perform ADL than those who did not. Also, those who did improve with physical therapy were more likely to have continued their home exercise program (HEP). Based on the results of our study, it is reasonable to assume that physical therapy can benefit those diagnosed with the aforementioned diagnoses. We also recommend that those receiving physical therapy follow a HEP.

Interpretations

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