Olivia Wetta
A Pilot Study: The Relationship Between a Patient's Self-Assessed Pain Tolerance, Patient Characteristics and Postoperative Pain Levels

SchoolMedina High School


ProgramScience


MentorSusan Schrantz, RN, and Lars Gilbertson, PhD


DepartmentCenter for Spine Health at Lutheran Hospital


Research
A Pilot Study: The Relationship Between a Patient's Self-Assessed Pain Tolerance, Patient Characteristics and Postoperative Pain Levels
Hypothesis
Postoperative pain scores will correlate with the patient's self-assessed pain tolerance preoperatively. Also, pain tolerance will correlate with certain demographics.
Methodology
Patient-assessed pain tolerance was assessed using a Likert scale in which the patient was asked to mark his or her pain tolerance on a 10 cm line anchored on the left by “biggest wimp” and the right by "toughest person." Preoperative pain score was collected using a similar Visual Analogue Scale. Postoperative pain score was collected from the chart using a holistic evaluation of all pain scores documented.
Outcomes
The results of this study show that strong relationships exist between age and postoperative pain (p=0.0036), as well as BMI and postoperative pain (p=0.0005). There may also be a relationship between procedure length and postoperative pain (p=0.0696), but further investigation with a larger sample size is needed for confirmation. Neither the SF-12 (PCS p=0.5530, MCS p=0.1464) nor patient-reported pain tolerance (p=0.2798) were predictors of postoperative pain. In addition, the SF-12 MCS had a strong predictive relationship with preoperative pain (p=0.0126). However, no relationship between patient-reported pain tolerance and preoperative pain (p=0.4967) was identified.

Interpretations

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