Nora Yorko
Is There a Relationship Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Children's Emotions?

SchoolHorizon Science Academy


ProgramNursing


MentorNancy M. Albert, PhD, RN


DepartmentPediatrics


Research
Is There a Relationship Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Children's Emotions?
Purpose
To determine if nurse uniform color has an emotional impact on school-age children who are hospitalized.
Methodology
This was a prospective, cross-sectional design using survey methodology. Subjects were between 7 and 17 years old and treated on a medical pediatric floor of a large, urban medical center. Subjects and their parents provided consent to participate. Subjects completed three surveys: About You (age, gender and ethnicity), How-I-feel Questionnaire (current emotional/anxiety state) and Mean Uniform Emotion Scale [MUES] (emotions elicited by different uniform colors). The MUES was completed after showing subjects a board with six 5”x 7” pictures of a nurse wearing different uniforms: all white, royal blue, pink print top/white pants, yellow print top/white pants, small handprint top on a white background/white pants and small flower top on a white background/white pants.
Outcomes
The adage that children fear nurses wearing a white uniform was not found to be true in this study. In addition, other negative emotions were not associated with one uniform color. Uniform color selection varied by some positive emotions (nice, good, pleasant and cheerful) but for most emotions, subject characteristics were not associated with uniform selection.

Interpretations

A Shower of Colorful Emotion by Sterling Harris

Color Blinded by Alyson Rua

Pink Power by Victoria Anielski