Khin-Kyemon Aung
Does the Time Post Delivery of Surfactant Administration Impact the Duration of Ventilation in Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

SchoolWilloughby South High School


ProgramRespiratory Therapy


MentorDaniel Sutton and Susan Brant


DepartmentRespiratory Therapy at Hillcrest Hospital


Research
Does the Time Post Delivery of Surfactant Administration Impact the Duration of Ventilation in Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome?
Hypothesis
There is no difference in duration of ventilation between early administration and very early administration of surfactant in very low birth weight infants.
Methodology
Data from 2004-2009 for premature neonates were collected from the Vermont-Oxford, Hillcrest Hospital and Cleveland Clinic databases. Retrospective chart review and linear correlation with SigmaPlot 10 were used to evaluate the association between surfactant delay (SD) and duration of ventilation (DV). Very early SD was defined as surfactant administration ≤45 minutes post delivery and early SD was administration>45 minutes. DV was defined as time from intubation to extubation. SD ranged from 19 to 207 minutes and DV ranged from 205 to 69,161 minutes.
Outcomes
No difference in primary outcome was found between early SD and very early SD. Surfactant administration in the delivery room may be unnecessary. There is no apparent harm in administering surfactant after stabilization in the NICU. These results provide benchmark data for further randomized controlled studies and suggest that efforts to improve protocol compliance related to treatment delay would be unnecessary.

Interpretations

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